Lake Albert Projects


Lake Albert is one of Wagga's popular recreational destinations, offering a range of facilities for all boat and recreational users.

Over the past ten years, Wagga Wagga City Council has been working to implement a range of recommendations in the Lake Albert Management Plan 2009-2015.

Some of these completed projects include:

  • Bosley Park Amenities Upgrade
  • Bosley Park Erosion Remediation
  • Stringybark Creek Remediation
  • Crooked Creek Remediation
  • Apex park upgrades
  • Foreshore erosion works
  • A full list of works from the Management Plan can be found in the works schedule.

In recent times, Lake Albert has been impacted by low water levels and increasing frequency of Blue Green Algae outbreaks. Council is currently working with the community to develop and implement strategies to address these issues.

These strategies identified will be included in the revised Lake Albert Management Plan along with other strategic actions in regards to management of Lake Albert. The draft Lake Albert Management Plan will be completed mid 2018 and be placed on public exhibition to receive community feedback.

Updates on the progress of the plan and other projects at Lake Albert will be posted on this website.


Lake Albert is one of Wagga's popular recreational destinations, offering a range of facilities for all boat and recreational users.

Over the past ten years, Wagga Wagga City Council has been working to implement a range of recommendations in the Lake Albert Management Plan 2009-2015.

Some of these completed projects include:

  • Bosley Park Amenities Upgrade
  • Bosley Park Erosion Remediation
  • Stringybark Creek Remediation
  • Crooked Creek Remediation
  • Apex park upgrades
  • Foreshore erosion works
  • A full list of works from the Management Plan can be found in the works schedule.

In recent times, Lake Albert has been impacted by low water levels and increasing frequency of Blue Green Algae outbreaks. Council is currently working with the community to develop and implement strategies to address these issues.

These strategies identified will be included in the revised Lake Albert Management Plan along with other strategic actions in regards to management of Lake Albert. The draft Lake Albert Management Plan will be completed mid 2018 and be placed on public exhibition to receive community feedback.

Updates on the progress of the plan and other projects at Lake Albert will be posted on this website.

  • Ultrasound Trial to control blue-green algae

    2 months ago
    Pontoonweb

    Wagga Wagga City Council is conducting a trial of an ultrasound system which aims to control cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) to safe levels in Lake Albert. The aim of the pilot project is to find a solution to keep the Lake open year-round for recreational use.

    Trial start: 17 December 2018
    Trial finish: 16 April 2020 - Extended in October 2019

    What is envirosonic ultrasound?

    Ultrasound are sound waves with frequencies higher than the upper audible limit of human hearing. At specific frequencies, these sound waves can be used to control algae growth by inducing sono-chemical reactions in water. The Envirosonic...

    Wagga Wagga City Council is conducting a trial of an ultrasound system which aims to control cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) to safe levels in Lake Albert. The aim of the pilot project is to find a solution to keep the Lake open year-round for recreational use.

    Trial start: 17 December 2018
    Trial finish: 16 April 2020 - Extended in October 2019

    What is envirosonic ultrasound?

    Ultrasound are sound waves with frequencies higher than the upper audible limit of human hearing. At specific frequencies, these sound waves can be used to control algae growth by inducing sono-chemical reactions in water. The Envirosonic units are solar powered and will be installed on five pontoons anchored to the bottom of the lake and will have malfunction alerts.

    Above: Pontoon locations in the lake.

    Why select ultrasound technology to manage blue-green algae?

    Ultrasound is one of several short-term treatment options available for managing algae. In addition to being efficient and cost-effective, the technology was selected because it was assessed to be best suited to the conditions at Lake Albert.

    Is ultrasound used elsewhere in Australia to control blue-green algae?

    Yes. Envirosonic installations are used at Grassy Dam, King Island, Tasmania (operated by Taswater), Candowie Reservoir, Gippsland (Operated by Westernport Water), Barren Box Dam, Griffith (operated by Murrumbidgee Irrigation) and at a lake operated by Bendigo Council, Victoria.

    How will the algae levels be tested?

    WWCC takes weekly water samples from Lake Albert, which are tested by ALS Water at their laboratory in Canberra. The performance of the ultrasound technology will be gauged against weekly lab results and the green, amber and red algae alert levels. The trial will be deemed successful if the cyanobacteria level are within 50,000 cells/mL (Amber Level) during peak summer months and 5,000 cells/mL (Green Level) during all other months.

    Why do blue-green algae blooms occur?

    Blue-green algae are a type of bacteria known as Cyanobacteria. They are a natural part of the freshwater environment. When it rains after a long period of dry weather, Lake Albert receives a high dose of storm water runoff loaded with nutrients, particularly nitrogen and phosphorous. This together with hot weather and still water with low turbulence, creates the conditions for an algal bloom. Algal blooms generally occur in still water rich in nutrients and thrives in dry, warm conditions.

    What happens at the end of the period?

    A second report will go to Council with the detailed results and a decision will be made to procure the ultrasound units.

    How can you help make the trial a success?

    The community can assist by following some simple guidelines:

    • Boat users should navigate carefully and avoid the pontoons
    • Don't climb on the pontoons
    • Report any tampering with the units to Council on 1300 292 442
    • Don't swim near the pontoons

  • Current Investigations For Maintaining Water Levels

    2 months ago

    Treatment for Algae Infested Water

    Council is currently undertaking a pilot project to assess the suitability of ultrasound technology to control blue-green algae. The management of Blue Green Algae is a complex problem that will require significant analysis to determine contributing factors and prevention strategies. Read more about the 2018/19 Blue-green algae remediation pilot project.

    Stormwater Diversion from the Tatton Drain

    Council is currently carrying out a detailed investigation and preparation of a detailed design, specification and cost estimates for the installation and ongoing operation of a stormwater diversion structure in the Tatton Drain. Once this investigation is completed,...

    Treatment for Algae Infested Water

    Council is currently undertaking a pilot project to assess the suitability of ultrasound technology to control blue-green algae. The management of Blue Green Algae is a complex problem that will require significant analysis to determine contributing factors and prevention strategies. Read more about the 2018/19 Blue-green algae remediation pilot project.

    Stormwater Diversion from the Tatton Drain

    Council is currently carrying out a detailed investigation and preparation of a detailed design, specification and cost estimates for the installation and ongoing operation of a stormwater diversion structure in the Tatton Drain. Once this investigation is completed, Council will be seeking grant funding for the implementation of this project.


  • Previous Investigations For Maintaining Water Levels

    2 months ago

    Groundwater Drilling

    There are three main aquifers within the city area, with one forming a water source for the city. Some of these aquifers are highly saline.

    In June 2015, Council allocated $20,000 from the Lake Albert improvements reserve to carry out further investigations into the viability of the ground water within close proximity to Lake Albert. Groundwater investigation works at Lake Albert commenced December 2015 in a partnership project between Council and Wagga Wagga Boat Club. Although a source water was found, it was insufficient to provide a sustainable inflow to the Lake.

    Treated Effluent

    For public health reasons,...

    Groundwater Drilling

    There are three main aquifers within the city area, with one forming a water source for the city. Some of these aquifers are highly saline.

    In June 2015, Council allocated $20,000 from the Lake Albert improvements reserve to carry out further investigations into the viability of the ground water within close proximity to Lake Albert. Groundwater investigation works at Lake Albert commenced December 2015 in a partnership project between Council and Wagga Wagga Boat Club. Although a source water was found, it was insufficient to provide a sustainable inflow to the Lake.

    Treated Effluent

    For public health reasons, recycled effluent for re-use in Lake Albert would need to be of a standard that is classified as Class A. Currently Council's treatment plant’s discharge is classified as Class B. Council sought funding to extend the Sewer 2010 project to allow plant to produce Class A water however was unsuccessful.

    The Lake Albert management plan estimated at the time the cost to upgrade the infrastructure from Class B to Class A discharge would be $10M - $12M.

    From The River

    Recent conversations with the relevant State Government departments have indicated that using river water to fill the Lake could be possible; however would require a significant Review of Environmental Factors before any application. After the review providing all requirements could be met it is likely that the licence would be issued as a zero allocation licence meaning Council would then have to purchase water from the open market to use under this licence. An alternative to this would be to purchase a licence on the open market which already has a water allocation.

    The main obstacles of using river water are:

    • the high cost of obtaining and maintaining a water licence,
    • the ongoing water usage costs,
    • the initial capital cost required to put in place the infrastructure necessary to be able to deliver the water